Living School Primary Program Builder

TEACHER/EDUCATOR'S NAME

LEARNING GROUP'S DETAILS

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STEP ONE

GENERATE YOUR KEYSTONE QUESTION AND YOUR LEARNING QUEST (PROJECT-BASED LEARNING)


LOOK AT THE FOCUS/INQUIRY QUESTIONS IN THE NSW SYLLABUSES

Consider the inquiry questions from the NESA syllabuses

LOOK AT THE FOCUS/INQUIRY QUESTIONS IN THE LIVING SCHOOL SCOPE AND SEQUENCES

Review HSIE, Science and PDH

 Kindy

LOOK AT THE FOCUS/INQUIRY QUESTIONS IN THE LIVING SCHOOL SCOPE AND SEQUENCES

Review HSIE, Science and PDH

Stage 1

LOOK AT THE FOCUS/INQUIRY QUESTIONS IN THE LIVING SCHOOL SCOPE AND SEQUENCES

Review HSIE, Science and PDH

 Stage 2

LOOK AT THE FOCUS/INQUIRY QUESTIONS IN THE LIVING SCHOOL SCOPE AND SEQUENCES

Review HSIE, Science and PDH

 Stage 3

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KEYSTONE THREAD

This is the BIG BROAD AND STUDENT INITIATED LEARNING you are focusing on with your class around the term's focus.

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STEP TWO

INTEGRATE MULTI-DISCIPLINARY LEARNING TO GROW DEEP UNDERSTANDING


CONNECTIONS THREAD - integrated learning around our termly KeyStone.

Think of ideas you would like your learners to consider in each of the Learning Lenses - as outlined below.

CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT

INTEGRATED LEARNING

Consider how you can use evocations in your lessons: quotes, short stories, poetry, illustrations, puzzles/quizzes.

ACTIVITIES & EXPERIENCES

Consider activities, brain breaks, challenges to keep learners engaged around the KeyStone quest.

CREATIVE EXPRESSION

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STEP THREE

FOCUS IN ON THE CONCEPTS/THEORIES TO BE TAUGHT IN ENGLISH/MATHS/SCIENCE/LOTE


CONCEPT THREAD

The disciplines of content in English, Maths, Science, LOTE (Bundjalung). Try to consider these within a six-week learning phase. Refer to the Living School scope and sequences, as well as NESA's syllabus requirements (ENG | MATHS | SCIENCE).

ENGLISH

Students must study examples of:

  1. spoken texts
  2. print texts
  3. visual texts
  4. media, multimedia and digital texts.

Across a stage of learning, the selection of texts must give students experience of:

  1. texts which are widely regarded as quality literature
  2. a widely defined Australian literature, including texts that give insights into Aboriginal experiences in Australia
  3. a wide range of literary texts from other countries and times, including poetry, drama scripts, prose fiction and picture books
  4. texts written about intercultural experiences
  5. texts that provide insights about the peoples and cultures of Asia
  6. everyday and community texts
  7. a wide range of factual texts that present information, issues and ideas
  8. texts that include aspects of environmental and social sustainability
  9. an appropriate range of digital texts, including film, media and multimedia.

MATHS

LIVING LEARNING MATHS CURRICULUM

The Mathematics K–10 Syllabus contains the syllabus content for Early Stage 1 to Stage 5. Within each stage, the syllabus is organised into the three content strands, Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability, with the components of Working Mathematically integrated into these strands. The syllabus is written with the flexibility to enable students to work at different stages in different strands. For example, students could be working on Stage 4 content in the Number and Algebra strand, while working on Stage 3 content in the Measurement and Geometry strand.

Outcomes, content, background information, and advice about language are organised into substrands within the three content strands. There are some substrands, mainly in Early Stage 1 to Stage 3, that contain the development of several concepts. To assist programming, the content in these substrands has been separated into two parts, ‘1’ and ‘2’, such as in ‘Area 1’ and ‘Area 2’. The first part typically focuses on early concept development. Teachers and schools need to decide how to program the two parts of these substrands within a stage.

In Early Stage 1 to Stage 3, the language section of each substrand includes a word list. Words appearing for the first time in each substrand are listed in bold type. In Stage 4 and Stage 5, the background information includes the purpose/relevance of the substrands.

OUTCOMES TO CONSIDER

WORKING MATHEMATICALLY

Communicating
MAe-1WM
describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings

Problem Solving
MAe-2WM
uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems

Reasoning
MAe-3WM
uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions

 

OUTCOMES TO CONSIDER

WORKING MATHEMATICALLY

Communicating
MA1-1WM
describes mathematical situations and methods using everyday and some mathematical language, actions, materials, diagrams and symbols

Problem Solving
MA1-2WM
uses objects, diagrams and technology to explore mathematical problems

Reasoning
MA1-3WM
supports conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how answers were obtained

 

REVIEW OUR MATHS EXPECTATIONS OF ATTAINMENT



Kindergarten - click here

Year One - click here

Year Two - click here

Year Three - click here

Year Four - click here

Year Five - click here

Year Six - click here

OUTCOMES TO CONSIDER

SCIENCE

Living World

The Living World strand explores living things and their needs. The key concepts developed within this strand are: living things have similar characteristics; are interdependent and interact with each other and their environment; living things and their features are related to the environments in which they live. Through this strand, students explore life cycles, structural adaptations and behaviours of living things. These developmental features and characteristics aid survival in particular environments.

Food and fibre are the human-produced or harvested resources used to directly sustain human life and are produced in managed environments, such as farms and plantations. Students develop knowledge and understanding about the managed systems that produce food and fibre through creating designed solutions. Students also develop knowledge, understanding and an appreciation for a variety of foods, sound nutrition principles and food preparation skills when making food decisions.

Material World

The Material World strand explores the characteristics and observable properties of substances and materials. Students explore how materials can be changed and combined. They explore change of state and investigate how chemicals can be combined and separated.

Students develop knowledge and understanding of the characteristics and properties of a range of materials in the development of projects. They build an awareness of the strengths and limitations of materials and integrate this knowledge into design decisions. Students develop an appreciation that the selection of materials and processes should be guided by informed consideration of ethical issues and the sustainability of resources.

Physical World

The Physical World strand explores the physical characteristics of objects and how this affects their movement. Light, sound and heat are identified as forms of energy that may be transferred and transformed, and explore the difference between contact and non-contact forces.

Students develop knowledge and understanding of forces, energy and the properties of materials and their behaviour on the performance of designed engineering solutions. They investigate how electrical energy can control movement in products and systems and learn how engineered products, services and environments can be designed and produced sustainably.

Earth and Space

The Earth and Space strand explores the Earth’s dynamic structure and its place in the universe. Students explore changes on Earth, such as day and night, and the seasons related to Earth’s rotation and its orbit around the Sun.

Students investigate the processes that result in changes to the Earth’s surface. They explore the ways in which we use Earth’s resources and consider the influence of human activity on the Earth’s surface and its atmosphere.

Digital Technologies

The Digital Technologies strand provides students with opportunities to investigate existing technologies and create digital solutions. They explore the automation of repetitive tasks through developing their own software and by using existing software packages. Through knowledge and understanding of digital technologies, students are encouraged to become critical consumers of information and creative producers of digital solutions.

Digital Technologies explores key concepts from computer science, information systems, software engineering and project management. These key concepts form the intellectual underpinning of Digital Technologies that take it beyond the current technologies and skills students learn in the ICT capability.

LOTE - Bundjalung syllabus: click here to review

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STEP FOUR

BACKWARD DESIGN (AITSL LINK) BY THINKING WHAT THE STUDENTS WILL LEARN AND HOW YOU WILL KNOW (ASSESSMENT AS, OF, FOR LEARNING)


ASSESSMENTS - Assessments Being Considered Over the Term

Add to the relevant week any assessments being considered.

Look at the NESA requirements (ENG | MATHS | SCIENCE) - you may have weekly spelling tests, reading assessments, writing tasks, etc..

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STEP FIVE

HOW WILL YOUR STUDENTS EXPERIENCE THE AHA MOMENT? HOW WILL YOU CONSIDER OFFERING EXPERIENCES BASED ON OUR BIG SIX?


Context Thread

Think about how you could use a project or target our preferred six experiences to offer understanding of abstract concepts in context - real world learning.  You may not offer all six each term, but you should look to offer all six over a semester.  This is about making learning hands-on, fun, real and engaging.

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STEP SIX

HOW CAN YOU USE THE LOCAL TO BE YOUR GUIDE? 


EXCURSION OR INCURSION?

Considering an excursion this term?

Please click on the Excursion Request Form link

Or think about someone in the community - perhaps an artisan or even a parent - who you can draw into the learning program for the term.  We want our students to identify learning outside of the 'school' boundaries - and to establish networks of support.